January 3, 2009

College Football Playoff?

I've never been hugely enthusiastic about the popular idea of instituting a playoff system for the college football season in the manner of the NCAA playoffs in basketball (as recently endorsed by Barack Obama).

Part of the problem is that football is a dangerous and destructive game, so adding intense, hard-hitting playoff games against the best opponents to the best players' college seasons will just cause that much more wear and tear on players who aren't getting paid (at least not paid above the table).

If the average NFL running back has maybe four good pro seasons in him, adding playoffs to the college season could end up reducing a running back at a top college's NFL career by a year, which is a lot. If you have an 8 team playoff instead of bowl games, a USC or Oklahoma running back might wind up playing six or seven more games in his college career, which is pretty close to the equivalent of a full season against mediocre opponents in which stars sit out the fourth quarter of blowout wins. If you have a 16 team playoff, that's more like ten or eleven hard games across four years.

Also, I'm not crazy about how college football has added two or even three games to the season during my lifetime. It's not like the college athletic directors sat down with the College Football Players Guild representatives and negotiated a bigger paycheck for the players in return for more work.

My published articles are archived at iSteve.com -- Steve Sailer

38 comments:

Bret Ludwig said...

That brings up the bigger question, which is what a raw deal the college football system is for most of the players. Rick Telander wrote a book some time ago, The Hundred yard Lie, which explained a lot of it.

Simply put the whole thing stinks. It leaves a lot of players (and a disproportionate number of minorities) torn up, broke and academically unprepared for any later life.

i am the walrus said...

The fact that Obama endorses a college football playoff is enough reason to oppose it. The guy doesn't even know the name of Penn State's mascot, yet he has a plan to improve college football. God, I hate liberals! He should stay focused on the rising price of arugula.

Anonymous said...

First, football is a violent sport, and no one is forced to play it.

Second, an 8-team playoff would result in additional games for only a tiny minority of college football players -- four of those teams will lose and play no more games than they would have otherwise, in a non-playoff situation.

Third, your concern about additional wear and tear could be ameliorated by having the four teams that advance in the 8-team playoff each get one regular season bye in the next season. That would throw a wrench into the scheduling, but it would be doable.

- Fred

Danindc said...

What do you mean Walrus the Nittaly Lions almost went undefeated!

Fred - that schedule with the bye thrown in is not doable- these schedules are made 5 years in advance

Steve - you make a great argument but an 8 game playoff would be so freakin cool those kids will just have to suffer for the greater good

guest007 said...

The problems with a college Division 1 (to use the old term) is that there are 11 conferences. Thus, for it to be an NCAA championship and not a BCS tournament, is that all of the conference champions would have to be in it. That leaves five wildcards.

The first round would have to happen during the first weekend after the first Thursday in December. I doubt if many people would get that excited about seeing Florida play Buffalo at some neutral site.

The third round would occur around Christmas and woudl involve two games (say Miami and Los Angeles). The fans would have a week to make travel plans to the games. The schools could not afford to take the full marching bands, cheerleaders, etcs, to those games. The would look very different than the current bowl games where the schools and fans have a month to prepare.

There is also the problem that the schools all have different calender. Some schools would be done with classes before the start, others would have finals gong on during the first two rounds.

Basketball and baseball lend themselves to tournaments since you can play several times per week.

Born Again Democrat said...

So the obvious answser is to shorten the regular season back down to 10 games like it used to be, plus three playoff games for the two survivors.

As for not letting the two best teams play each other, isn't that the whole point?

The match-ups this year were pitiful. Hopefully the ratings will reflect that.

James Kabala said...

The thing about a college football playoff is that divisions 1-AA (or "Championship Division" as it is now called), 2, and 3 all manage to surmount these problems and have playoffs, as do other violent sports such as hockey and even (IIRC) wrestling.

travis said...

Why would an athletic director at Oregon State or Stanford vote to give Southern Cal two to three extra games a year on national television?

Anonymous said...

Yeah, there's something amazing about the PR victory inherent in defining paying your employees in cash (as opposed to company scrip redeemable only in your company store) as a form of cheating, and getting everyone in the country (including law enforcement) to go along. The only PR victory that compares is the successful definition of card counting in blackjack as cheating.

Ed Campion said...

Born Again Democrat: So the obvious answer is to shorten the regular season back down to 10 games like it used to be, plus three playoff games for the two survivors.

Here, here!

10 games in 12 weeks with no games in August.

patrick said...

The regular season should be shortened to 8-9 games.

Take Penn State for example, the Big 10 is consistently mediocre besides Ohio State and Michigan. I know, I know, Mich State, Purdue, Iowa, even Northwestern have decent teams once in a while, but for the most part, the Big 10 is average besides the Buckeyes and Wolverines.

Penn State's non-conference games included Coastal Carolina, the Temple Owls, and Akron? or some other stiff from the Mid-America Conference.

Cancel out those 3 shitty non-conference games and make room for a playoff!

jody said...

i like how the news media runs with the idea that because obama is black and is going to be the president, that his opinion on sports carries some kind of extra weight. i mean, he's black, he's good at this stuff, right? he knows sports, and we should endorsing his ideas.

in reality, obongo is just some half kenyan who is not really good at sports, but wishes he were. this is pretty consistent with steve's idea that obongo is preoccupied with constantly showing that he is "black enough". kenyans are not good at any sport except distance running. obongo rode the bench for a high school basketball team in hawaii. he basically sucks at sports, yet the news media breathlessly reports on his pickup basketball games, which is ridiculous, as he's a skinny 47 year old smoker who could not even start for a crap hawaiian squad when he was a teenager.

he's far less athletic than say, gerald ford or norman schwarzkopf, who i'm guessing were never described breathlessly by the media as athletic. ron paul, a pennsylvania state high school champion in track, was ten times the athlete obongo was.

Bruce Wayne said...

Steve,

College athletes are paid, to the tune of upwards of 30-40K a year. It is called a full ride college scholarship. With most room and board as well. In fact, many female soccer players are also paid handsomely in college in similar fashion, and as you well know girls are much more susceptible to traumatic head injury then boys.

Bill said...

I'll let you football nerds figure this one out, as I'm sure you can. Football would die were it not for the excessive thought put into its management by legions of pocket-protector types. It's the NASA of sports.

Only in America...

headache said...

jody sed:
"i like how the news media runs with the idea that because obama is black and is going to be the president, "

He could have opinions on plasma physics or hypergolic rocket engines and the MSM would run with it as gospel. The more they carry on with this Obama nonsense the more ridiculous they make themselves. Up to now one could accept this outrageous bias as intentional gross vote influencing and a display of their utter disdain of true democracy. But their Obama hero worship makes them look like any tinfoil rag in one of the third world countries.

bjdouble said...

Big time amateur sports are doomed in the long run, and that includes the NCAA. What's going to happen is that the big sport teams are going to be professional, and will pay a fee to the schools for the US of the logo and so on. The athletes will have access to the school if they choose, but it won't be mandatory. They will be students by courtesy.

Anonymous said...

The reason for the NCAA never establishing a playoffs in Division I is very simple: They make an enormous amount of money off the bowl season. It has nothing to do with scheduling pressures or physical wear and tear on the athletes, as evidenced by the fact that every other lower division in football has a playoff system in place, and by the fact that if they trimmed the regular season back to 11 games and created an 8 team playoff, teams reaching the finals will only be playing in their 14 game, which is no more games than Virgina Tech, Boston College, Missouri, and Alabama played this year(Florida and Oklahoma will both play their 14th game of the year on Thursday).

Anonymous said...

I played on my school team as a wide receiver. One day a few guys couldn't be at practice, and the coach asked for a volunteer to play the line, and I did.
I had no idea what I had been missing, which was basically a thorough ass kicking each and every play. When I played noseman, that was the worst.
I held my own, I was pretty big, but the beatings you take... you just have to experience them. The only analogy is getting into a fistfight with a maniac, resting a minute and doing it again, for four quarters.
I had a friend, 6 foot 6, 300 pounds, and he played pro ball. A lineman. He lasted all of one season. Spent 4 months in a hospital with a severe neck injury.
He was in amazing physical shape, all muscle, couldn't hack it.
He was getting pretty screwed up before the neck injury. That's just what finally closed him down.
I recall relating my short experience saying, "being a lineman is not only about talent, but it's also about being willing to get the holy shit beaten out of you every single game, isn't it?"
He said "Right on the money."
It's hell on the line. Nobody has any idea what it's like if they haven't done it. Tons more violent than boxing.
If more people understood what goes on down on the line, the game would be outlawed.
When you watch on TV, it doesn't convey a fraction of the living hell down there.
So, any proposed measure that would increase games in college is a message from the devil.
Ask any pro player who's on the line. All those players, especially linemen, usually pay a horrific physical price in the long run.
A few seasons if they're lucky, and many are literally crippled for life.
They take amphetamines and hormones to hold their shit together artificially. After the party's over, most are left a wreck.

l. ron hoover said...

"But their Obama hero worship makes them look like any tinfoil rag in one of the third world countries."

The other day I stopped at a Borders bookstore in Chicago. There was a table full of Obama hagiographies, a virtual shrine to the man. I thought this was rather creepy. Never before in my lifetime have I been implicitly told that I have to worship, love, or even like the president. Yet this is what almost all media outlets are telling us to do now.

kurt9 said...

Like some of the other commenters here, I'm beginning to view football (both college and NFL) as a gladiator sport. As a result, I am watching much less of it.

Anonymous said...

I love you Steve.

Truth said...

"i like how the news media runs with the idea that because obama is black and is going to be the president, that his opinion on sports carries some kind of extra weight."

Well, you're half right. The media runs with the idea that because Obama is the president his opinion carries extra weight, When Obama was asked that question, McCain was asked the same question about improving sports and said something about 'cracking down on steroids'.

The president is the theoretical 'world's most powerful man', therefore, surprisingly, people are interested in his opinion. I know Jody, it shocks me too.

"he's far less athletic than say, gerald ford or norman schwarzkopf, who i'm guessing were never described breathlessly by the media as athletic. ron paul, a pennsylvania state high school champion in track, was ten times the athlete obongo was."

Yes, I liked Mr. Paul, but he's also 73 YEARS OLD!

That means that at this point in his life, he's probably not much of an athlete. Additionally, Obama's interest is in a 'cooler' sport than that of Ron Paul, as evidence of this, we do not make the NCAA Track and Field Championships a two-week multi-billion dollar extravaganza as we do with March Madness. 'Obongo' as you so cleverly call him is 1) youthful, 2) slim, 3) relatively attractive and yes 4) black. That is the order as to why the press plays up his athleticism. Somehow, I doubt that David Patterson or Henry Burris, or Al Sharpton gets the same treatment from their local press.

As far as the playoff issue itself is concerned, the regular season will not be cut down to 8 or 9 games because this would cause 103 programs to loose revenue so that 16 could gain it. The bowls will also not be abolished because those are private corporations which make money and with a playoffs, they would cease to exist.

I am one of the few people who does not complain about the BCS because the drama it creates causes me to hold my interest during the regular season, if there were a 16 or even 8 team playoff, I would simply not tune in until it started. I very rarely watch college basketball until March.

I believe I have the excellent solution to this dilemma:

Every year, you rotate three of the six BCS bowls as playoff bowls. You rate the top four teams in college football, and in say the Sugar bowl '09, number one plays number four, and in the Cotton Bowl '09 number two plays number three.

The winners than meet in say the Orange Bowl '09; the other three bowls retain their traditional conference affiliations as well as possible.

The bowls still make money, you have a true number one at the end of the season, no extra games are added and the only drawback is that every year, one team gets credit for winning two BCS bowls. But one can't have everything.

Truth said...

"In fact, many female soccer players are also paid handsomely in college in similar fashion, and as you well know girls are much more susceptible to traumatic head injury then boys."

Yes, but I believe the point is that female soccer players do not generate revenue for the school, as a matter of fact they generally lose revenue as at most campuses the only two positive revenue sports are men's basketball, and men's football.

TCO said...

I enjoy the debates about which team was really number one. I don't even like the BCS system.

albertosaurus said...

I'm glad to see this discussion. Last week I suggested that all schools teach prospective football players the life of Jim Otto. Double O was the Iron Man. Alas real flesh and blood players accumulate injuries. Otto in later life used to roll out of bed - onto the floor - each morning. His feet and knees didn't work well enough for him to stand up first thing in the morning.

As to the genius who takes moral refuge in the notion that it is all volunteerism, shame on you. In the Ridley Scott film Gladiator Maximus is captured and sold into slavery as a gladiator. Nonsense. At the time of Aurelius and Commodus, serving as a gladiator was voluntary. Antonius Pius had given male slaves the right to refuse to serve as a gladiator and female slaves the right to refuse to serve in a brothel. The problem was that so many young men of good families volunteered to be a gladiator that the praetors had to refuse them.

The commenter who said that the line in football was rougher than boxing is probably right too. All sports are getting less destructive of the participants - except American football. Roman boxers for example didn't wear padded boxing gloves they wore the caesus - a kind of full size brass knuckles with spikes. An early reform was bare knuckles.

Basketball until recently was brutal too. The first star center, George Mikan, routinely left his opponents teeth on the court. When Chamberlain first came in the league his problem in playing the Celtics wasn't Russell so much as it was "Jungle Jim" Luskatov. Luskatov couldn't run, shoot, pass or dribble. He contributed elbows under the basket. Chamberlain's ribs were considered fair game in those days.

Anonymous said...

From a Sooner fan in Norman, OK:

The bowls provide a chance for more teams and their fans to end the season with a win. More end of the season pinnacles of success to go around.

The bowl game experience is a lot of fun for the players, the band members, the family and fans of the teams that get to go. Good memories that last a life time.

For good teams that by mid-season are out of the National Championship race, going to the Cotton Bowl or the Gator Bowl is another pinnacle to shoot for. Especially if you're a senior, on a team that has not been to a bowl game for several years.

Bowl games are fun to watch too. All of em. The players, the fans, and the band members have a level of enthusiasm that is unique to it being the last game of the year, and for some, the last game of their football days.

ricpic said...

I have never read in any sports section of a paper or heard on radio or TV the graphic description of what actually goes on in lineplay posted by anonymous, the wide receiver, on this thread. I have no reason to doubt his word. The question I have is why? Why isn't the truth about the brutality of football and its literal destruction of the body spoken of in main stream outlets?

Anonymous said...

"The question I have is why? Why isn't the truth about the brutality of football and its literal destruction of the body spoken of in main stream outlets?"

It gets mentioned once in a while:
http://archive.newsmax.com/archives/articles/2006/10/3/122610.shtml

but mainly the NFL doesn't want the negative publicity because this could get in the way of their making money.

As to why they die so young, there are probably 3 main contributing factors:
1) damage from taking large quantities of steroids, HGH, amphetamines, and pain killers.
2) many of them are large men who don't properly adjust their diets and consequently become obese after retirement. This places a great strain on their hearts.
3) the jarring blows they take during their career causes brain trauma and damages their internal organs (liver, kidneys, etc.). The orthopedic injuries they suffer are not in and of themselves causes of early death, but generally leave ex-players crippled and/or in pain, which limits their activity and contributes to factor 2 above.

Much of the "improvements" in equipment, such as helmets with facemasks and hard shoulderpads have actually made the game more dangerous because they allow the players to use their bodies (especially their heads) as battering rams, transferring the full momentum of their bodies running at full speed into each other. I've played rugby and football, and football is far more dangerous because of the pads. In rugby, you are taught to wrap and tackle. In football you are taught to "deliver a blow." If you tried to put a football tackle on someone while playing rugby, you'de either a) dislocate your shoulder, or b) break your neck. Also, since there is no blocking in rugby, you only get hit when you are expecting to (e.g., running the ball, entering a ruck or maul). Most football injuries occur because someone gets blindsided by a blocker or by someone getting blocked into them by a blocker.

As for line play, I've played both O- and D-line. It's not necessarily more brutal than other positions. In fact, the players don't get much of a run up at each other, so the collisions acutally tend to be less violent that the hits receivers take from safeties and linebackers. Also, linemen (especially offensive linemen) tend to have among the longest careers in the NFL (RBs have the shortest and take a hell of a beating) and don't seem to have as many serious orthopedic injuries as other positions.

As for boxing vs. football, I've done some amatuer boxing and football is much more brutal. In boxing the strength of a blow is limited to how much force you can generate in your hips, thighs and core and transfer through your hands with your feet planted on the ground. This may be a lot, but its not as much as the amount of force you can generate by plowing into someone while running at full speed. Also, the gloves (and headgear in amatuers) greatly reduce the force of the blows by lengthening out the impact time. Furthermore, in boxing, you are generally expecting to get hit and know where your opponent is comming from. As I wrote above, in football, you can often get blindsided.

On reflection, I'm convinced football was designed by the American association of orthopedic surgeons to drum up business ;-) (I certainly had to have an ACL reconstruction out of it. Luckily they can fix these things these days and it's more or less as good as new - but I know I'll get arthritis in it someday.)

Anonymous said...

OT, but I want our blogfather to know that the Steveosphere has now expanded to the WSJ:

Housing Push for Hispanics Spawns Wave of Foreclosures

By SUSAN SCHMIDT and MAURICE TAMMAN

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123111072368352309.html

California Rep. Joe Baca has long pushed legislation he said would "open the doors to the American Dream" for first-time home buyers in his largely Hispanic district. For many of them, those doors have slammed shut, quickly and painfully.

Mortgage lenders flooded Mr. Baca's San Bernardino, Calif., district with loans that often didn't require down payments, solid credit ratings or documentation of employment. Now, many of the Hispanics who became homeowners find themselves mired in the national housing mess. Nearly 9,200 families in his district have lost their homes to foreclosure.

Congressional districts with large Hispanic populations often feature heavy nonprime lending. See how different districts break down in terms of prime and nonprime home loans.

For years, immigrants to the U.S. have viewed buying a home as the ultimate benchmark of success. Between 2000 and 2007, as the Hispanic population increased, Hispanic homeownership grew even faster, increasing by 47%, to 6.1 million from 4.1 million, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Over that same period, homeownership nationally grew by 8%. In 2005 alone, mortgages to Hispanics jumped by 29%, with expensive nonprime mortgages soaring 169%, according to the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council.

An examination of that borrowing spree by The Wall Street Journal reveals that it wasn't simply the mortgage market at work. It was fueled by a campaign by low-income housing groups, Hispanic lawmakers, a congressional Hispanic housing initiative, mortgage lenders and brokers, who all were pushing to increase homeownership among Latinos.

The network included Mr. Baca, chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, whose district is 58% Hispanic and ranks No. 5 among all congressional districts in percentage of home loans not tailored for prime borrowers. The caucus launched a housing initiative called Hogar -- Spanish for home

----snip----

patrick said...

I was an undersized O-Lineman and walked-on at a Div I-AA power for my first 2 years of school in the late 80's.

The first day of practice I was lined up against a senior All-American D-Tackle. We were wearing only helmets and the drill was supposed to be a walk-thru.... only that I did not know at the time that the All-America douchebag loved to fuck up freshman.

He hit me with a forearm to the head that felt like a sledgehammer. If I wasn't wearing a helemt I would have been knocked out for 10 minutes.

Fast forward to the first day of full pads and scrimmaging: Everyone moved so FAST and hit very hard, including the D-Backs. In high school, a lineman did not worry much about D-backs because of the size difference, but in college, these 180lb-210lb bastards would hit like a ton of bricks ... never get caught standing around a pile at the end of a play, your ass would get picked off like sniper prey.

Going into summer camp I felt strong as hell but after that 3 week camp my body was shot and the season had not even started yet. It was long year spent on the "scout" team.

The scout team is the group of scrubs that goes against the 1st team every week to prep them for the game on Saturday. I think football is the greatest game, but one pays a large price in the process.

testing99 said...

The current bowl system rests on tradition, and the legacy of the games, some of which go back not decades but nearly a hundred years.

Football is built on tradition, and to destroy it (Obama the clueless as usual wants to destroy tradition) is a terrible idea that will be resisted.

jody said...

"Well, you're half right. The media runs with the idea that because Obama is the president his opinion carries extra weight, When Obama was asked that question, McCain was asked the same question about improving sports and said something about 'cracking down on steroids'."

john mccain is an idiot who, in the 90s, tried to make MMA illegal. despite this moron, in 2008 MMA set the all-time pay per view sales record. over 5 million PPV orders were placed for over $270 million in revenue, far exceeding any single year in boxing. yet, how many times during the election was mccain's opposition to MMA discussed by ESPN? by SI? by any major sports outlet? it would have been a completely germane topic, as mccain is a classic boxing guy who desperately wanted to kill MMA. did anybody even ask mccain about boxing just by itself, and what could be done to restore it to it's previous glory on network television? boxing used to be far more popular than football.

"The president is the theoretical 'world's most powerful man', therefore, surprisingly, people are interested in his opinion. I know Jody, it shocks me too."

how many media people were interested in gw bush's opinions on major league baseball? he only LITERALLY had a minority ownership in a major league baseball team. was the sports media citing president bush's opinions on the game? telling us that george's opinion on the matter should be our opinion on the matter?

"That means that at this point in his life, he's probably not much of an athlete. Additionally, Obama's interest is in a 'cooler' sport than that of Ron Paul,"

sure, ron paul is 70 and not much of an athlete anymore. but obongo was never an athlete. that's the point. obongo is not athletic and never was. and what gives you the idea that ron paul is not interested in football today? because he was a track champion? how does that make him not interested in football today? ron paul simply did not comment on NCAA football, which put him in the majority among presidential candidates. let's not pretend obongo would have made a better football player. ron paul was a track sprinter and was far more likely to have been a good football player than obongo.

"as evidence of this, we do not make the NCAA Track and Field Championships a two-week multi-billion dollar extravaganza as we do with March Madness."

we're not talking about either of those events. we're talking about NCAA football. but since you brought them up, track and field is more popular than NCAA basketball, and the IAAF world championship is a bigger deal. only americans watch march madness. the world watches the track & field world championship.

" 'Obongo' as you so cleverly call him is 1) youthful, 2) slim, 3) relatively attractive and yes 4) black. That is the order as to why the press plays up his athleticism."

obongo is not athletic, though. he's not an athlete. which you don't seem to understand.

this is a perfect illustration of the deliberate american ignorance about race, which steve points out all the time. kenyans are garbage as athletes. they can't play basketball. if they could, they would. if they could play soccer, they would. americans don't understand the difference between west africans and east africans. to most americans, they're just all the same. nobody has even checked obongo's athletic credentials, which, in a general trend with obongo, are total crap.

Anonymous said...

And where is Truth now on this story? A bit quiet as the MSM fall in behind Steve.

Oh WSJ why hast thou foresaken me? - Truth

Peter said...

john mccain is an idiot who, in the 90s, tried to make MMA illegal. despite this moron, in 2008 MMA set the all-time pay per view sales record. over 5 million PPV orders were placed for over $270 million in revenue, far exceeding any single year in boxing. yet, how many times during the election was mccain's opposition to MMA discussed by ESPN? by SI? by any major sports outlet? it would have been a completely germane topic, as mccain is a classic boxing guy who desperately wanted to kill MMA. did anybody even ask mccain about boxing just by itself, and what could be done to restore it to it's previous glory on network television? boxing used to be far more popular than football.

McCain dropped his opposition to MMA in the last few years as the sport became better managed and regulated. He now accepts it as a legitimate sport.

Truth said...

"ohn mccain is an idiot who, in the 90s, tried to make MMA illegal..."

The point is that someone asked McCain about his opinion on sports, just as they did with his opponent "Obongo". All this other stuff is completely insignificant.

"was the sports media citing president bush's opinions on the game?"

He didn't give any that I'm aware of. Have you heard something? If George W.Bush had made statements on baseball, the media would have covered them becaue HE'S THE FUCKING PRESIDENT OF THE U.S.!

"sure, ron paul is 70 and not much of an athlete anymore. but obongo was never an athlete."

The way you speak about Obama, you must have played basketball with him. From what people say, he's a fairly competent mid-forties recreational level player. I am not aware of anyone saying he's Michael Jordan, and what he was thirty years ago is somewhat insignificant now, isn't it?

"and what gives you the idea that ron paul is not interested in football today?"

I have no idea whether he is or isn't, but I do know that if he were the republican nominee for president HE WOULD HAVE BEEN ASKED JUST AS MCCAIN WAS.

"let's not pretend obongo would have made a better football player. "

Again, you're dealing with insider information that I just don't have access to here. I'll have to defer to your knowledge; what I can say however is that if I had to start a flag football team today I WOULD CHOOSE A 46 YEAR OLD TO PLAY WIDE RECEIVER OVER A 73 YEAR OLD!

"track and field is more popular than NCAA basketball, and the IAAF world championship is a bigger deal. only americans watch march madness. the world watches the track & field world championship."

Wonderful, but Obama and Paul were running for President of the US. When they run for International Grand Pubah of the Universe, we will revisit this argument, okay?

"obongo is not athletic, though. he's not an athlete. which you don't seem to understand."

Again, I haven't competed against him so I wouldn't know.

". kenyans are garbage as athletes. they can't play basketball. if they could, they would. if they could play soccer, they would."

I don't believe in generalizing. Since he's half white are we to assume that he has a small cock?

Truth said...

"americans don't understand the difference between west africans and east africans. to most americans, they're just all the same..."

Apparently, they are to you as well, because 'Obongo' is a West African name generally found in Cameroon and Nigeria.

Anonymous said...

Start with a 4 team playoff and go from there. How often are more than 4 teams really, truly seriously in contention for the national championship, anyway.
Shorten the regular schedules by one game to compensate, if necessary.

Apparently, they are to you as well, because 'Obongo' is a West African name generally found in Cameroon and Nigeria.

Well whatever it "generally" is, it is at least occasionally found as a name in Kenya, because is the name of Barack Obama's half brother.

691 said...

Adding a few extra games might take time off the career of an NFL prospect, but very few collegiate football players make it. For the vast majority, their college years are it and any extra opportunities to play before time runs out (graduation) is appreciated.