February 3, 2013

Lights out at the Super Bowl: "In Retrospect, I Guess We Might Have Resorted To Cannibalism A Bit Early"

Here.

25 comments:

FWG said...

Why are you posting during the Super Bowl? Why am I commenting on iSteve during the Super Bowl?

That was funny sir, thank you. All the sudden this is a ballgame. May the power outage conspiracy theorizing commence.

Matthew said...

"In retrospect, I guess we might have bought into the 'Republicans need to embrace more Latino immigration' idea a bit early. I mean, ya know, 2012 was at least one whole election away from the massive Republican victories of 2010, but we got desperate, ya know? Time has little meaning when you're in an electoral situation like that. So we found ourselves edging closer and closer to the traditional middle class/law & order Republican voting block of the party. I mean, they were the biggest block, and we figured by sacrificing them we could win at least a few dozen more Hispanic votes in Miami and Ft. Lauderdale. Our brilliant Hispanic campaign consultant, Ari Martinez-Rubenstein, convinced us it was a lock."

Archae Babae said...

Ha. Ha. Or something.

Anonymous said...

Cannibals' fav pizza? One with everyone on it, natch.

Anonymous said...

Reminds me of the Kids in the Hall skit about the "inexperienced cannibal".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krHu4E65khA

Norville Rogers said...

re: Boomer Esiason-- he was always more combative compared to his fellow yakkers and showboaters; I compare it to Howie Long scowling between the blabbermouth good ol' boys burbling about intangibles & weapons. It is as if the residual, justified ego and arrogance from having been a legit jock remains, but with slight insecurity or uneasiness over the regression-to-backslapping of inane panel segments. I think it's the only thing saving these otherwise worthless chatfests. Here's a clip specially for Truth, where the dissident role falls to Michael Irvin somehow (the namby-pamby Mormon and ESPN's epitome of the insufferable analyst on the sides are merely filling the air). But the people in Philly are ever prone to emotional reasoning

Norville Rogers said...

I mean, I'm just saying in public, stuff I'd otherwise say in another post publicly; per the advice of Chuck Klosterman (the new Thoreau, or at least Dos Passos)
http://www.theonion.com/articles/donovan-mcnabb-id-like-to-thank-the-ungrateful-ove,17235/

Anonymous said...

The Rush Limbaugh thing really scared Steve Young. That firing basically ensured steve will be a good boy for the rest of his career.

Truth said...

"Here's a clip specially for Truth,..."

First of all, Michael Irvin said nary a word in that clip, second of all, why was it "specially" for me? And thirdly, Steve Young said that KOY DETMER was a better option than McNabb; how'd that work out?

Anonymous said...

America's "most holy night" watching commercials and cheering for " panem et circenses" ...
this country is no longer worth defending or even justifying. Good riddance, America.

Anonymous said...

Are Zero Hedge and I the only people who noticed that the halftime-show negresses were thrusting a shocking amount of pubic-region lingerie in our faces by [what ought to be] the standards of an ostensibly family-oriented nationwide television broadcast?

Is this the new normal for our "society"?

Pole-Dancing Barbie for the little girls, and Man's Country Ken for the little boys?

PS: Taxpayers threw $471 million at the Superdome after Hurricane Katrina, yet the Chocolate City still couldn't keep the power on.

Be prepared for the future, folks; be very, very prepared...

Anonymous said...

Amusingly, less than an hour before the lights went out at the Super Bowl, my roommate and I had been discussing the endemic corruption and incompetence in the state of Louisiana. Apparently, the power company was blaming the Superdome people, and the Superdome people were blaming the power company. Put more directly, some politician's halfwit brother-in-law was blaming some other politician's drunkard nephew, and vice-versa.

pat said...

I have a football question.
Is football now just luck?

I had some people over for the Super Bowl yesterday. They wanted to see the game on a big TV. I have a nine foot screen. So for the first time in years I watched a football game.

I was struck with a kind of "first impression". I was amazed at how the score seemed to be only a function of the official's decisions and various trivial random incidents.

The score didn't seem connected with team's respective skill levels.

I once saw the actor Don Cheadle beat poker champ Phil Ivey on TV. Celebrities play golf and tennis against pros but they always lose. Not in poker. Poker allows chance to play a major part in the outcome. That's what football looks like to me now.

It didn't use to. When I followed football I never doubted that Joe Montana was virtuous and worthy. But now everything looks to me to be just dumb luck. Maybe I have "fresh eyes" and can now perceive the truth. Or maybe I'm full of beans once again.

There should be a statistic that captures the proportion of a game's outcome that is attributable to pure luck. Is there a measure also of the proportion of the outcome that is traceable only to the actions of the referees as opposed to actions of the players?

Albertosaurus

Anonymous said...

Amusingly, less than an hour before the lights went out at the Super Bowl, my roommate and I had been discussing the endemic corruption and incompetence in the state of Louisiana.

Simply can't happen in America. White western Christians are too morally perfect for any sort of corruption and incompetence.

Matthew said...

"I have a football question. Is football now just luck?"

The fact that SEC teams have won the last seven national college football championships, and Alabama three of the last four, suggests that, at least in college, the answer is almost certainly "No."

Cail Corishev said...

"I was struck with a kind of "first impression". I was amazed at how the score seemed to be only a function of the official's decisions and various trivial random incidents."

In the NFL, especially once you weed out the truly weak teams, pretty much. In a lot of games, you could pick out a bad bounce on a fumble, or a holding call that brings back a big gain, which could have swung the entire game the other way. I guess that's parity.

Jim said...

Wow--i'd never seen the Rush firing tape. (Thanks Mr.Rogers)I'd known that his supposed "racist remark" was basically saying he thought McNabb had been overrated based on race and that Philly had been good because of its defense, rather than McNabb being great.

You see the thing and ... holy cow, how utterly tame. The PC police state is worse than i think. (Granted a huge percentage of this was just taking down Limbaugh in particular.)

JeremiahJohnbalaya said...

I only watched a few minutes of the game(***). But, is anyone talking about the ridiculously obvious holding call on the Ravens last play, the non-punt? It allowed them to run out at least enough time for one more play on the SF side. Anyone who cares (not me) should be lamenting that non-call.

(*** Now, that Puppy Bowl IX... Great stuff!)

peterike said...

Interesting to think what would have happened if the Superdome were filled with a representative cross-sampling of New Orleans residents rather than a crowd of the wealthy and connected. Might have been sumpin' to see when the lights went out.

Livin' in a home of of the bray-ayyyy-ayyyy-avvvvveeeeeeeee!

Steve Sailer said...

"When I followed football I never doubted that Joe Montana was virtuous and worthy. But now everything looks to me to be just dumb luck."

Montana and his coach Bill Walsh really did have better ideas how to do things. Now everybody has incorporated Walsh's advances.

Marc B said...

"Simply can't happen in America. White western Christians are too morally perfect for any sort of corruption and incompetence."

Remember that this partial blackout occurred in New Orleans, and the incompetence involved could have just as easily been caused by a black employee who is a member of the Nation of Islam as by a White Christian. New Orleans (60% black) is among the most corrupt (and with tons of private/public sector nepotism & favoritism) cities in America South of Chicago, and everybody there acknowledges it regardless of race.

Truth said...

"The score didn't seem connected with team's respective skill levels... Poker allows chance to play a major part in the outcome. That's what football looks like to me now.

It didn't use to. When I followed football I never doubted that Joe Montana was virtuous and worthy. But now everything looks to me to be just dumb luck."

No, I agree, Pat; there are too many black in the NFL.

Truth said...

BTW: Rush Limbaugh was not fired, he resigned.

Anonymous said...

BTW: Rush Limbaugh was not fired, he resigned.
Truth, the most ironically named poster here.

The Anti-Gnostic said...

But, is anyone talking about the ridiculously obvious holding call on the Ravens last play, the non-punt?

I thought the same thing at the time, until a friend explained that the penalty for a hold in the end zone is a safety which they were going for in any event. So, the Ravens ST coach would tell them don't just hold, wrap up and sit on them.

They pay coaching staffs big bucks not to overlook these sorts of gems in the rule books.

BTW, Kapernick is not a "running QB." I think he has a great future.