April 20, 2014

Hurricane Carter's long hunt for the real killers is over

39 comments:

Anonymous said...

Have to admit that Bob Dylan's song is still pretty good. Even despite the "If you're black you might as well not shown up on the street" bullshit.

leftist conservative said...

through Rubin Carter's Death all the racist sins of the white race may be forgiven. Celebrate His Death by accepting the nonwhite immigration in their millions into your neighborhood, your workplace and your country.

Rubin Carter died, and through him, by celebrated anti-racism, your sins of racism may be forgiven.


He has fallen, but He Will Rise Again through the Struggle Against Racism.

Anonymous said...

Off Topic:

_Nature_ magazine has an interesting article on the top ten scientists of 2013. It seems that Asian, Black, and White male scientists spend their time doing hard science while White female scientists spend their time fighting injustice and male privilege.

http://www.nature.com/news/365-days-nature-s-10-1.14367

Hepp said...

Anyone wanna give me the Cliff Notes version of this story?

the media said...

So what, George Washington owned slaves

Anonymous said...

Anyone wanna give me the Cliff Notes version of this story?


What's the frequency, Kenneth?

Matra said...

According to the late, and very knowledgeable boxing expert, Bert Sugar, "Hurricane" Carter was a murderer. According to the mass media Carter was an innocent man wrongly convicted for being black. I'll go with Sugar despite what his fellow tribesman Bob Dylan said.

foseti said...

@Hepp,

You can follow the links here: http://acrossdifficultcountry.blogspot.com/2014/04/hurricane-carter-dead.html

ben tillman said...

Have to admit that Bob Dylan's song is still pretty good. Even despite the "If you're black you might as well not shown up on the street" bullshit.

It's a great song. The words are excellent propaganda, and the music's swirl evokes a hurricane.

ben tillman said...

Anyone wanna give me the Cliff Notes version of this story?

http://www.patbrownprofiling.com/hurricane.html

Chicago said...

Another race fraud story of an "innocent" man framed up by the system. Celebrity idiots like Dylan helped spring a triple murderer and turned him into a celebrity. More info available at:
-graphicwitness.com/carter/
-members.shaw.ca/cartermyths/
-weirdrepublic.com/episode15.htm

Anonymous said...

Anyone wanna give me the Cliff Notes version of this story?

Normally, a Wikipedia would suffice but it, being a liberal kingdom, already sterilized this story. Here is what's there now about Rubin's character:

"He acquired a criminal record and was sentenced to a juvenile reformatory for assault shortly after his 14th birthday. Carter escaped from the reformatory in 1954 and joined the Army. A few months after completing infantry basic training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, he was sent to West Germany. While in Germany Carter began to box for the United States Army."

Here are few more details that were dropped:
"In May 1956, he received an "Undesirable" discharge, having served 21 months of his three-year term of enlistment.
Carter was discharged from the Army on May 29, 1956, and was arrested less than a month later for his escape from Jamesburg Home for Boys. After his return to New Jersey, Carter was picked up by authorities and sentenced to an additional 9 months for escaping from the reformatory. He went to Annandale prison for five months. Shortly after being released, Carter committed a series of muggings, including assault and robbery of a middle-aged black woman. He plead guilty to the charges and was imprisoned in East Jersey State Prison in Avenel, New Jersey, a maximum-security facility, where he would remain for the next four years and spent time in the Rahway and Trenton state prisons until his release in September 1961."

That's when he started his professional career...

Anonymous said...

Probably the best summation of the story, and not to endorse his beliefs or general philosophy, was William Pierce's American Dissident Voices radiocast. My family lived north of Paterson (North Haledon) at that time and it was well known what really happened.

Anonymous said...

A fun analysis of The Rubinator.

countenance said...

Hurricane Carter's back story sounds a little like Sonny Liston's back story, except for the murders. Liston, as a boy and young man, committed so many crimes while wearing a yellow shirt that the St. Louis Police Department referred to him as the "yellow shirt bandit."

When he was finally sent to Jefferson City, (and I can assure you, not for winning an election), that's when he got into boxing during his "sojourn."

Anonymous said...

It is a great song. I was obsessed with the song and entire album for the longest time Dylan's rage when singing the lines are almost enough to fool ya into thinking Carter might have been innocent. Now I tend to thinkof it as a textbook example of why Plato banished poets from the Republic

DPG said...

Wow, this movie came out when I was in high school and I always took it and the Dylan song at face value. Deeper down the Steveosphere rabbit hole I go.

I mean, how rich is the irony? A story about the racial bias of our justice system is actually about a guy who exacted a racial revenge killing on a bartender he didn't like.

Anonymous said...

I always thought the Hurrican was especially pernicious of Dylan because it cast a pall of skepticism over the ballad of Hattie carol which was almost entirely true and was an example of pretty much shocking injustice.

Legion said...

So... Now we wait for OJ to kick?

Anonymous said...

Looking at the public record, it seems pretty obvious he was guilty, and *2* juries said so.

How did he get all the celebrity endorsements anyways? He was just a minor boxer, not Roman Polanski.

Dave Pinsen said...

Google just hired this female scientist for their venture to defeat death. Ambitious enough for you?

Anonymous said...

I can usually rely on wikipedia for honesty, or at least a section in the article that offers a critique of the mainstream view.

As someone who knew nothing about the man until 20 minutes ago, iv'e already learned that he has killed at least one person without any justification.

He locked a grocery store manager in a room during a robbery. The manager died of a heart attack trying to escape the room.

I also read that he has a history of robbery, violence and anger issues. It makes sense that he became become a boxer.

Anonymous said...

Uh, the grocery store thing i said is false. Pat brown needs to learn how to use the square bracket....

Anonymous said...

The song's lyrics, and most of the other songs on "Desire," were written by Jacques Levy. He was best known for his collaboration with Roger McGuinn, and staging "Oh! Calcutta!"

Big Bill said...

"He acquired a criminal record ...

Nope. You "earn" a criminal record. You "acquire" a car.

"Please excuse me, Officer Friendly. I do hate to disturb you, but I am very interested in acquiring a 'criminal record'. Would you happen to have one you could spare? Thanks ever so much for your time and consideration."

[I do love liberal-speak!]

David said...

No songs were squeezed for the Juice.

But a former colleague of mine issued a witticism about him. During the summer of the murders, when asked at work for her breakfast order, she outlined her dietary restrictions and then added, "Just milk to drink, no OJ. Because, OJ can kill you." After an uncertain pause, the other women in the office laughed politely. Good times, good times.

Who says women aren't funny?

The Anti-Gnostic said...

Google just hired this female scientist for their venture to defeat death. Ambitious enough for you?

Aging boomers, growing ever more frantic over the realization that they are going to die.

I bet she forgot to have kids too, but that's just a guess.

peterike said...

A great song? It's a terrible song. I guess Dylan was in his "hagiography of criminals" mode at the time, because the album contains the equally heinous "Joey," a tribute to mob thug Joey Gallo.

The album is redeemed, however, by the sprightly "Mozambique," the ominous "One More Cup of Coffee" and that delightful bit of pure Dylanny genius, "Black Diamond Bay."

Otherwise, it's really not a very good album.

peterike said...

How did he get all the celebrity endorsements anyways? He was just a minor boxer, not Roman Polanski.

There's always a Great Black Victim of Injustice floating around somewhere. For the past 30-plus years that role has been served by Mumia Abu-Jamal. Originally cool because he supposedly killed a cop, and because the real radical Left digs that, and because everyone knows he actually did it. The "Free Mumia" thing is really just about ragging the system. It seems to have finally tired itself out and you don't seem to hear as much about it anymore except maybe from Communist blacks on radical radio stations.

But then again, we had Trayvon for a while filling the role. Whoever will be next?

Anonymous said...

Another excellent analysis of liberal judges, media, politicians and one tenured Northwestern professor and his "innocence project" colluding to set a murderer free and discredit the chicago pd and capital punishment....

http://newcity.com/2014/02/20/crossing-lines-whats-wrong-with-the-wrongful-conviction-movement/

jody said...

he was a journeyman level boxer, definitely not anyone of particular note. but i notice the modern trend to turn even average african athletes from days gone past, into notable figures of the sport, if there is some angle to work.

a carefully crafted media campaign, combined with a television special or a movie, is highly effective at getting people under 30 to think that some run of the mill guy was a significant figure in his era.

jody said...

meanwhile the kansas city sniper turned out to be mohammed pedro whitaker, an african convert to islam.

doubt that case will get half the television coverage as some old, average boxer dying.

Anonymous said...

I now realize this guy and the NFL player with the same name were two different people. I have an early memory of watching the football Carter destroying, I think, the Notre Dame offense.

pat said...

This is getting creepy.

This morning I decided to read up on blacks. I downloaded "Uncle Tom's Cabin" in my Kindle. And also "12 years a Slave". Both are free. While reading some background on '12 years' I remembered the old James Garner movie 'Skin Game'. I was sure I was the only person who had ever made that connection.

Then I ran across your Taki's review. It was exactly what I was going to write. You must be older than I thought. Or else you are bugging my forebrain.

Carter's death was on the Web so I looked at a few articles on him too. I developed an opinion on Carter only to find that you had reached the same conclusions earlier. Sommabitch.

But I do know one or two things you probably don't. I watched the Rubin Carter-Joey Giardello championship fight today. I think I saw it live. Carter faded after the 10th round. He wasn't going to ever be champ. Giardello sued him over how that fight was portrayed in the film and the producers settled.

I remember watching Carter fight on TV a couple times. He beat Emile Griffith but only after Griffith had stopped hitting as hard as he could because he wanted to avoid killing another opponent like he killed Kid Peret.

Denzel Washington was much too tall to play Carter. The Hurricane was five inches shorter than Washington. He was known for being short. Sort of like Tyson.

Washington told an interesting story about training for the movie role. He tried to do his own boxing and had learned some real boxing from real trainers. He told Charlie Rose that he was accumulating to many head blows. He was getting nasty with others on the set and his personality was deteriorating. He also couldn't remember his lines anymore.

About 30% of all boxers who are in the game for several years get Dementia pugilistica. Most don't show symptoms for ten years or more but some earlier it seems.

With modern medical imaging someone is bound to publish a study of fighter's brains and very soon - no more prize fighting.

There was a campaign to deny Washington the Oscar mounted by neighbors of the policeman played by Dan Hedaya. He was, they said, a sweet guy who was defamed in his portrayal in the movie. They think that without their efforts Washington would have won.

After a half day of reading Carter's story he sounds like a psychopath and an habitual liar. He's like Al Sharpton might have been be if he had been less fat and more muscular.

Albertosaurus

Anonymous said...

Sara and Oh, Sister are also both very moving songs. Sara, especially. I read that Sara Lowndes (sp?) was actually in the studio as he recorded the song. Unmoved.

Anonymous said...

How much of an asshole do you have to be to die a liar after recieving all that praise? That's some Cartman level douchebaggery.

Anonymous said...

Then I ran across your Taki's review. It was exactly what I was going to write. You must be older than I thought. Or else you are bugging my forebrain.

Pat, you post comments *every day* on Steve's blog, and you even know how old he is? He's in his mid-50s. It's clear enough from his picture - good-looking 55 though.

Anonymous said...

Norman Jewison, huh? Remarkable.

the anonymous from four minutes ago said...

To follow up Jody's point, the Dylan song repeatedly yammers on about how Carter "could have been the champion of the world." There is absolutely no basis for this claim - he was never anywhere near world champion level. Everything the public thinks it knows about this man is a calculated lie.